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Harvard School of Public Health

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Fall 1 2009

Department of Epidemiology, Department of Society, Human Development and Health and Department of Population and International Health
Dr. S. Missmer (P), Invited guest lecturers
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health-that is, the way gender has contributed to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course aims to answer such questions as: How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health?

This course is designed for students who wish to enhance their understanding of, and skills to address, the social and cultural factors that have influenced the development of individual's and societal health. The interfaces among gender, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality will also be emphasized.

The course will cover a broad range of health issues for which gender has been of special importance. Topics to be covered include: reproductive health, sexual health and sexuality; violence; occupational health and work; chronic and communicable disease. Issues relating to the distribution of health, disease and well-being, including policy, will be addressed across sessions. Additionally, sessions will include international, domestic, and historical perspectives, with attention paid to both epidemiologic research and policy dimensions.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 1 2008

Department of Epidemiology, Department of Society, Human Development and Health and Department of Population and International Health
Dr. S. Missmer (P), Invited guest lecturers
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health-that is, the way gender has contributed to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course aims to answer such questions as: How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health?

This course is designed for students who wish to enhance their understanding of, and skills to address, the social and cultural factors that have influenced the development of individual's and societal health. The interfaces among gender, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality will also be emphasized.

The course will cover a broad range of health issues for which gender has been of special importance. Topics to be covered include: reproductive health, sexual health and sexuality; violence; occupational health and work; chronic and communicable disease. Issues relating to the distribution of health, disease and well-being, including policy, will be addressed across sessions. Additionally, sessions will include international, domestic, and historical perspectives, with attention paid to both epidemiologic research and policy dimensions.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 1 2007

Department of Epidemiology, Department of Society, Human Development and Health and Department of Population and International Health
Dr. S. Missmer (P), Invited guest lecturers
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health-that is, the way gender has contributed to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course aims to answer such questions as: How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health?

This course is designed for students who wish to enhance their understanding of, and skills to address, the social and cultural factors that have influenced the development of individual's and societal health. The interfaces among gender, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality will also be emphasized.

The course will cover a broad range of health issues for which gender has been of special importance. Topics to be covered include: reproductive health, sexual health and sexuality; violence; occupational health and work; chronic and communicable disease. Issues relating to the distribution of health, disease and well-being, including policy, will be addressed across sessions. Additionally, sessions will include international, domestic, and historical perspectives, with attention paid to both epidemiologic research and policy dimensions.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2006

Department of Epidemiology, Department of Society, Human Development and Health and Department of Population and International Health
Dr. S. Missmer (P), Dr. M. Stampfer (S), Invited guest lecturers
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health-that is, the way gender has contributed to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course aims to answer such questions as: How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health?

This course is designed for students who wish to enhance their understanding of, and skills to address, the social and cultural factors that have influenced the development of individual's and societal health. The interfaces among gender, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality will also be emphasized.

The course will cover a broad range of health issues for which gender has been of special importance. Topics to be covered include: reproductive health, sexual health and sexuality; violence; occupational health and work; chronic and communicable disease. Issues relating to the distribution of health, disease and well-being, including policy, will be addressed across sessions. Additionally, sessions will include international, domestic, and historical perspectives, with attention paid to both epidemiologic research and policy dimensions.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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