Course Website Locator: wgh200-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Spring 1 2010

Departments of Society, Human Development and Health, Global Health and Population, Epidemiology, and Environmental Health
Dr. S. Gruskin, Dr. N. Krieger
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions asked and explanations and interventions offered for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples pertaining to breast cancer, smoking, cumulative trauma disorders of hands and wrists, HIV/AIDS, violence, access to health services, sexual health, reproductive health, and population policy. In all these cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being of women and men.

Course Note: Enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2009

Departments of Society, Human Development and Health, Population and International Health, and Epidemiology
Dr. S. Gruskin, Dr. N. Krieger
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions asked and explanations and interventions offered for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples pertaining to breast cancer, smoking, cumulative trauma disorders of hands and wrists, HIV/AIDS, violence, access to health services, sexual health, reproductive health, and population policy. In all these cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being of women and men.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2008

Departments of Society, Human Development and Health, Population and International Health, and Epidemiology
Dr. S. Gruskin, Dr. N. Krieger
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions asked and explanations and interventions offered for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples pertaining to breast cancer, smoking, cumulative trauma disorders of hands and wrists, HIV/AIDS, violence, access to health services, sexual health, reproductive health, and population policy. In all these cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being of women and men.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2007

Departments of Society, Human Development and Health, Population and International Health, and Epidemiology
Dr. N. Krieger, Dr. S. Gruskin
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 3-hour session each week.

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions asked and explanations and interventions offered for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples pertaining to breast cancer, smoking, cumulative trauma disorders of hands and wrists, HIV/AIDS, violence, access to health services, sexual health, reproductive health, and population policy. In all these cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being of women and men.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to 25 students; signature of instructor required; no auditors. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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