Course Website Locator: shh210-01

Harvard School of Public Health

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Spring 2010

Ms. N. Swenson
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

Many state, local, and national governments now have Women's Health programs. The course surveys selected contemporary women and health issues in a global and historical context. Because women - and their children - worldwide are the majority of the poor, we will focus on a common framework: the impact of economic development alongside the impact of laws, customs, and medical systems that affect the human development and health of women and their families. We also analyze key roles women play in caregiving and in health and medical care services. Through written and oral testimonies, and policy letters, students will be able to develop advocacy and policy analysis skills, using epidemiological review, gender analysis, media monitoring, and an introduction to Evidence Based Medicine in medical technologies for healthy women. A critical framework derived from a variety of social science disciplines, and including human rights research, also illuminates the worldwide activism of the women's health movement.
Course activities: Discussion, guest lecturers, preparing and delivering testimonies, possible field trips, and school-wide video showings/discussion (optional). Materials include readings and websites, sample testimonies, video clips, work books. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2009

Ms. N. Swenson
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

Many state, local, and national governments now have Women's Health programs. The course surveys selected contemporary women and health issues in a global and historical context. Because women - and their children - worldwide are the majority of the poor, we will focus on a common framework: the impact of economic development alongside the impact of laws, customs, and medical systems that affect the human development and health of women and their families. We also analyze key roles women play in caregiving and in health and medical care services. Through written and oral testimonies, and policy letters, students will be able to develop advocacy and policy analysis skills, using epidemiological review, gender analysis, media monitoring, and an introduction to Evidence Based Medicine in medical technologies for healthy women. A critical framework derived from a variety of social science disciplines, and including human rights research, also illuminates the worldwide activism of the women's health movement.
Course activities: Discussion, guest lecturers, preparing and delivering testimonies, possible field trips, and school-wide video showings/discussion (optional). Materials include readings and websites, sample testimonies, video clips, work books. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2008

Ms. N. Swenson
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

Many state, local, and national governments now have Women's Health programs. The course surveys selected contemporary women and health issues in a global and historical context. Because women - and their children - worldwide are the majority of the poor, we will focus on a common framework: the impact of economic development alongside the impact of laws, customs, and medical systems that affect the human development and health of women and their families. We also analyze key roles women play in caregiving and in health and medical care services. Through written and oral testimonies, and policy letters, students will be able to develop advocacy and policy analysis skills, using epidemiological review, gender analysis, media monitoring, and an introduction to Evidence Based Medicine in medical technologies for healthy women. A critical framework derived from a variety of social science disciplines, and including human rights research, also illuminates the worldwide activism of the women's health movement.
Course activities: Discussion, guest lecturers, preparing and delivering testimonies, possible field trips, and school-wide video showings/discussion (optional). Materials include readings and websites, sample testimonies, video clips, work books. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2007

Ms. N. Swenson
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

Many state, local, and national governments now have Women's Health programs. The course surveys selected contemporary women and health issues in a global and historical context. Because women - and their children - worldwide are the majority of the poor, we will focus on a common framework: the impact of economic development alongside the impact of laws, customs, and medical systems that affect the human development and health of women and their families. We also analyze key roles women play in caregiving and in health and medical care services. Through written and oral testimonies, and policy letters, students will be able to develop advocacy and policy analysis skills, using epidemiological review, gender analysis, media monitoring, and an introduction to Evidence Based Medicine in medical technologies for healthy women. A critical framework derived from a variety of social science disciplines, and including human rights research, also illuminates the worldwide activism of the women's health movement.
Course activities: Discussion, guest lecturers, preparing and delivering testimonies and school-wide video showings/discussion (optional). Materials include readings and websites, sample testimonies, video clips, work books. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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