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Harvard School of Public Health

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Spring 1 2010

Dr. E. Nardell, Dr. E. Rubin, Dr. S. Fortune
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2 -hour sessions each week.

This is a comprehensive survey course on tuberculosis featuring lectures by some of the leading authorities in the field. The first half of the course focuses on population issues (TB epidemiology in the US and the world), transmission, modeling, and programmatic issues (the essentials of good TB control both here and in high burden countries). The second month deals more with the biomedical aspects of TB, immunology, genetics, diagnosis, decision analysis, and treatment, again, both here and abroad. There is a field trip to the Massachusetts State Laboratory. Because of involvement of several of the faculty, special attention is paid to the global problem of multidrug resistant TB, and the work of Partners in
Health, an NGO associated with the medical school. During the second month, medical students join the SPH students for an elective course involving patient interviews at the state TB hospital. They present these cases and related topics in class during the second month. SPH students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and one or more presentations on relevant TB topics of interest. The course ends on or near World TB Day, with optional TB-related activities in the Boston area.
Course Note: This course is intended for students interested in any aspect of tuberculosis, biological, programmatic, international health, and epidemiologic. Some knowledge of immunology and molecular biology is desirable, but not required.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2009

Dr. E. Nardell, Dr. E. Rubin, Dr. S. Fortune
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2 -hour sessions each week.

This is a comprehensive survey course on tuberculosis featuring lectures by some of the leading authorities in the field. The first half of the course focuses on population issues (TB epidemiology in the US and the world), transmission, modeling, and programmatic issues (the essentials of good TB control both here and in high burden countries). The second month deals more with the biomedical aspects of TB, immunology, genetics, diagnosis, decision analysis, and treatment, again, both here and abroad. There is a field trip to the Massachusetts State Laboratory. Because of involvement of several of the faculty, special attention is paid to the global problem of multidrug resistant TB, and the work of Partners in
Health, an NGO associated with the medical school. During the second month, medical students join the SPH students for an elective course involving patient interviews at the state TB hospital. They present these cases and related topics in class during the second month. SPH students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and one or more presentations on relevant TB topics of interest. The course ends on or near World TB Day, with optional TB-related activities in the Boston area.
Course Note: This course is intended for students interested in any aspect of tuberculosis, biological, programmatic, international health, and epidemiologic. Some knowledge of immunology and molecular biology is desirable, but not required.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2008

Dr. E. Nardell, Dr. E. Rubin
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2 -hour sessions each week.

This is a comprehensive survey course on tuberculosis featuring lectures by some of the leading authorities in the field. The first half of the course focuses on population issues (TB epidemiology in the US and the world), transmission, modeling, and programmatic issues (the essentials of good TB control both here and in high burden countries). The second month deals more with the biomedical aspects of TB, immunology, genetics, diagnosis, decision analysis, and treatment, again, both here and abroad. There is a field trip to the Massachusetts State Laboratory. Because of involvement of several of the faculty, special attention is paid to the global problem of multidrug resistant TB, and the work of Partners in
Health, an NGO associated with the medical school. During the second month, medical students join the SPH students for an elective course involving patient interviews at the state TB hospital. They present these cases and related topics in class during the second month. SPH students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and one or more presentations on relevant TB topics of interest. The course ends on or near World TB Day, with optional TB-related activities in the Boston area.
Course Note: This course is intended for students interested in any aspect of tuberculosis, biological, programmatic, international health, and epidemiologic. Some knowledge of immunology and molecular biology is desirable, but not required.
Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2007

Dr. E. Nardell, Dr. E. Rubin
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2 -hour sessions each week.

This is a comprehensive survey course on tuberculosis featuring lectures by some of the leading authorities in the field. The first half of the course focuses on population issues (TB epidemiology in the US and the world), transmission, modeling, and programmatic issues (the essentials of good TB control both here and in high burden countries). The second month deals more with the biomedical aspects of TB, immunology, genetics, diagnosis, decision analysis, and treatment, again, both here and abroad. There is a field trip to the Massachusetts State Laboratory. Because of involvement of several of the faculty, special attention is paid to the global problem of multidrug resistant TB, and the work of Partners in
Health, an NGO associated with the medical school. During the second month, medical students join the SPH students for an elective course involving patient interviews at the state TB hospital. They present these cases and related topics in class during the second month. SPH students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and one or more presentations on relevant TB topics of interest. The course ends on or near World TB Day, with optional TB-related activities in the Boston area.
Course Note: This course is intended for students interested in any aspect of tuberculosis, biological, programmatic, international health, and epidemiologic. Some knowledge of immunology and molecular biology is desirable, but not required.
Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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