Course Website Locator: id513-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Spring 1 2010

Dr. Norman Daniels
2.5 credits
Not Offered 2008-2009
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

When is an inequality in health status an injustice or inequity? This course examines various aspects of this issue, bringing appropriate perspectives from ethical theories (utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, feminist) to bear on case studies revealing a range of important health disparities. Four main cases will be discussed, each focusing on a central type of health disparity: U.S. racial disparities, class disparities, gender disparities in a developing country setting, and global health inequalities. Key questions to be pursued in each case include: when is an inequality in health between this type of demographic variable unjust? When is a policy that produces, or fails to address, such an inequality race- or gender- or class-biased in an morally objectionable way? What ethical issues are raised by different methods of measuring health inequalities? How does ascription of responsibility for health affect the fairness of health inequalities? What kind of obligations exist to address health inequalities across national boundaries? What ethical issues are raised by policy approaches to addressing health inequalities and giving priority to reducing them?


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2008

Department of Population and International Health and Department of Society Human Development and Health
Dr. Norman Daniels
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

When is an inequality in health status an injustice or inequity? This course examines various aspects of this issue, bringing appropriate perspectives from ethical theories (utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, feminist) to bear on case studies revealing a range of important health disparities. Four main cases will be discussed, each focusing on a central type of health disparity: U.S. racial disparities, class disparities, gender disparities in a developing country setting, and global health inequalities. Key questions to be pursued in each case include: when is an inequality in health between this type of demographic variable unjust? When is a policy that produces, or fails to address, such an inequality race- or gender- or class-biased in an morally objectionable way? What ethical issues are raised by different methods of measuring health inequalities? How does ascription of responsibility for health affect the fairness of health inequalities? What kind of obligations exist to address health inequalities across national boundaries? What ethical issues are raised by policy approaches to addressing health inequalities and giving priority to reducing them?


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2007

Department of Population and International Health and Department of Society Human Development and Health
Dr. Norman Daniels
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

When is an inequality in health status an injustice or inequity? This course examines various aspects of this issue, bringing appropriate perspectives from ethical theories (utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, feminist) to bear on case studies revealing a range of important health disparities. Four main cases will be discussed, each focusing on a central type of health disparity: U.S. racial disparities, class disparities, gender disparities in a developing country setting, and global health inequalities. Key questions to be pursued in each case include: when is an inequality in health between this type of demographic variable unjust? When is a policy that produces, or fails to address, such an inequality race- or gender- or class-biased in an morally objectionable way? What ethical issues are raised by different methods of measuring health inequalities? How does ascription of responsibility for health affect the fairness of health inequalities? What kind of obligations exist to address health inequalities across national boundaries? What ethical issues are raised by policy approaches to addressing health inequalities and giving priority to reducing them?
Course Note: For course evaluation, please refer to PIH501, the former number for this course. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Copyright © 2012 The President and Fellows of Harvard College