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Harvard School of Public Health

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Spring 1 2010

Dr. D. Wikler
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.
Evaluation: Exams plus one term project (case study term paper, in-class debate, or tutorial)

Provides students with a broad overview of some of the main philosophical and moral ideas that are used as a basis for resolving debates of public health policy. Helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments

The practice of public health require moral reflection and argument for a number of reasons. Public health measures often make demands on the public, such as changes in lifestyles or restrictions of liberties, and these must be justified. Practitioners of public health frequently face ethical dilemmas, both in framing policy and in practice in the field, whose optimal resolution is uncertain. The work of public health practitioners is sometimes challenged on moral grounds, which must be examined and, when appropriate, countered.

The resources for moral argument and justification in public health are found in moral philosophy and philosophical theories of justice; and also in history, the social sciences, and in the science of public health itself. Students in this course will survey some of the principle philosophical approaches in addressing a number of ethical controversies in contemporary public health.

Issues and concepts discussed in the course will be drawn from this list:

Definitions of health
Ethical issues in health measurement: DALYs and QALYs
Ethical norms in public health and clinical medicine
Moral epistemology and the rational foundation of moral norms
Ethics and human rights
Ethical relativism
Consequentialist and deontological ethical theories
Contractualist and rival theories of distributive justice
State coercion and paternalism in public health
Individual and social responsibility for health
Ethics and emergency humanitarian interventions
Ethical issues in health resource allocation
Health disparities and inequalities
Ethical issues in international health research involving human subjects
Ethics of public health communication
Ethical integrity of practioners: conflict of interest and corruption

(5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2009

Dr. D. Wikler
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.
Evaluation: Exams plus one term project (case study term paper, in-class debate, or tutorial)

Provides students with a broad overview of some of the main philosophical and moral ideas that are used as a basis for resolving debates of public health policy. Helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments

The practice of public health require moral reflection and argument for a number of reasons. Public health measures often make demands on the public, such as changes in lifestyles or restrictions of liberties, and these must be justified. Practitioners of public health frequently face ethical dilemmas, both in framing policy and in practice in the field, whose optimal resolution is uncertain. The work of public health practitioners is sometimes challenged on moral grounds, which must be examined and, when appropriate, countered.

The resources for moral argument and justification in public health are found in moral philosophy and philosophical theories of justice; and also in history, the social sciences, and in the science of public health itself. Students in this course will survey some of the principle philosophical approaches in addressing a number of ethical controversies in contemporary public health.

Issues and concepts discussed in the course will be drawn from this list:

Definitions of health
Ethical issues in health measurement: DALYs and QALYs
Ethical norms in public health and clinical medicine
Moral epistemology and the rational foundation of moral norms
Ethics and human rights
Ethical relativism
Consequentialist and deontological ethical theories
Contractualist and rival theories of distributive justice
State coercion and paternalism in public health
Individual and social responsibility for health
Ethics and emergency humanitarian interventions
Ethical issues in health resource allocation
Health disparities and inequalities
Ethical issues in international health research involving human subjects
Ethics of public health communication
Ethical integrity of practioners: conflict of interest and corruption

(5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2008

Dr. D. Wikler
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.
Evaluation: Exams plus one term project (case study term paper, in-class debate, or tutorial)

Provides students with a broad overview of some of the main philosophical and moral ideas that are used as a basis for resolving debates of public health policy. Helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments

The practice of public health require moral reflection and argument for a number of reasons. Public health measures often make demands on the public, such as changes in lifestyles or restrictions of liberties, and these must be justified. Practitioners of public health frequently face ethical dilemmas, both in framing policy and in practice in the field, whose optimal resolution is uncertain. The work of public health practitioners is sometimes challenged on moral grounds, which must be examined and, when appropriate, countered.

The resources for moral argument and justification in public health are found in moral philosophy and philosophical theories of justice; and also in history, the social sciences, and in the science of public health itself. Students in this course will survey some of the principle philosophical approaches in addressing a number of ethical controversies in contemporary public health.

Issues and concepts discussed in the course will be drawn from this list:

Definitions of health
Ethical issues in health measurement: DALYs and QALYs
Ethical norms in public health and clinical medicine
Moral epistemology and the rational foundation of moral norms
Ethics and human rights
Ethical relativism
Consequentialist and deontological ethical theories
Contractualist and rival theories of distributive justice
State coercion and paternalism in public health
Individual and social responsibility for health
Ethics and emergency humanitarian interventions
Ethical issues in health resource allocation
Health disparities and inequalities
Ethical issues in international health research involving human subjects
Ethics of public health communication
Ethical integrity of practioners: conflict of interest and corruption

(5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2007

Dr. D. Wikler
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week.
Evaluation: Exams plus one term project (case study term paper, in-class debate, or tutorial)

Provides students with a broad overview of some of the main philosophical and moral ideas that are used as a basis for resolving debates of public health policy. Helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments

The practice of public health require moral reflection and argument for a number of reasons. Public health measures often make demands on the public, such as changes in lifestyles or restrictions of liberties, and these must be justified. Practitioners of public health frequently face ethical dilemmas, both in framing policy and in practice in the field, whose optimal resolution is uncertain. The work of public health practitioners is sometimes challenged on moral grounds, which must be examined and, when appropriate, countered.

The resources for moral argument and justification in public health are found in moral philosophy and philosophical theories of justice; and also in history, the social sciences, and in the science of public health itself. Students in this course will survey some of the principle philosophical approaches in addressing a number of ethical controversies in contemporary public health.

Issues and concepts discussed in the course will be drawn from this list:

Definitions of health
Ethical issues in health measurement: DALYs and QALYs
Ethical norms in public health and clinical medicine
Moral epistemology and the rational foundation of moral norms
Ethics and human rights
Ethical relativism
Consequentialist and deontological ethical theories
Contractualist and rival theories of distributive justice
State coercion and paternalism in public health
Individual and social responsibility for health
Ethics and emergency humanitarian interventions
Ethical issues in health resource allocation
Health disparities and inequalities
Ethical issues in international health research involving human subjects
Ethics of public health communication
Ethical integrity of practioners: conflict of interest and corruption

(5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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