Course Website Locator: hpm518-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Spring 2 2009

Dr. D. Prothrow-Stith
2.5 credits
Lectures. One 3-hour session each week

This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to explore risk factors and remedies for the high occurrence of violence in the United States. Special emphasis will be given to the public health approach to violence prevention, and to successes of public health work in addressing youth and community violence over the past two decades. Course sessions will trace the links between exposure to violence in childhood and involvement in interpersonal and street-based violence later in life. Early warning signs and dynamics of violence in dating, common-law, marriage and terminated relationships will be reviewed, as will juvenile offenses and responses by the criminal justice and health care sectors. Students interested in doing clinical work, policy and program design, or research are encouraged to use this course as a foundation. Supplemented by insights from practioners, this course will provide a rich context for understanding policy and programmatic challenges in addressing the high incidence of violence in this country. (8.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2008

Dr. D. Prothrow-Stith
2.5 credits
Lectures. One 3-hour session each week

This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to explore risk factors and remedies for the high occurrence of violence in the United States. Special emphasis will be given to the public health approach to violence prevention, and to successes of public health work in addressing youth and community violence over the past two decades. Course sessions will trace the links between exposure to violence in childhood and involvement in interpersonal and street-based violence later in life. Early warning signs and dynamics of violence in dating, common-law, marriage and terminated relationships will be reviewed, as will juvenile offenses and responses by the criminal justice and health care sectors. Students interested in doing clinical work, policy and program design, or research are encouraged to use this course as a foundation. Supplemented by insights from practioners, this course will provide a rich context for understanding policy and programmatic challenges in addressing the high incidence of violence in this country. (8.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2007

Dr. D. Prothrow-Stith
2.5 credits
Lectures. One 3-hour session each week

This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to explore risk factors and remedies for the high occurrence of violence in the United States. Special emphasis will be given to the public health approach to violence prevention, and to successes of public health work in addressing youth and community violence over the past two decades. Course sessions will trace the links between exposure to violence in childhood and involvement in interpersonal and street-based violence later in life. Early warning signs and dynamics of violence in dating, common-law, marriage and terminated relationships will be reviewed, as will juvenile offenses and responses by the criminal justice and health care sectors. Students interested in doing clinical work, policy and program design, or research are encouraged to use this course as a foundation. Supplemented by insights from practioners, this course will provide a rich context for understanding policy and programmatic challenges in addressing the high incidence of violence in this country. (8.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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