Course Website Locator: hpm278-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Spring 2 2010

Dr. L. Marcus, Dr. B. Dorn
1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution. Particular emphasis is placed on integrating analytic skills, negotiation techniques and conflict resolution methods into the practice of public health. The course is built around the concepts and methods of "The Walk in the Woods" � a four step method of interest-based negotiation model developed by the instructors. Much of the class is devoted to simulation exercise in which general concepts and methods are demonstrated and practiced. These exercises model disputes typical of health care settings and public health problems. The debriefing which follows each exercise offers individual feedback, as well as the opportunity to examine applied issues of organizational communication, system design, and conflict. By the end of the course, students will have knowledge of the overt and covert causes of conflict, concepts for analyzing disputes and a variety of methods useful for preventing, resolving and when necessary, initiating a conflict.

Course Note: Enrollment limited to 48 students. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2009

Dr. L. Marcus, Dr. B. Dorn
1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution. Particular emphasis is placed on integrating analytic skills, negotiation techniques and conflict resolution methods into the practice of public health. Much of the class is devoted to simulation exercise in which general concepts and methods are demonstrated and practiced. These exercises model disputes typical of health care settings and public health problems. The debriefing which follows each exercise offers individual feedback, as well as the opportunity to examine applied issues of organizational communication, system design, and conflict. By the end of the course, students will have knowledge of the overt and covert causes of conflict, concepts for analyzing disputes and a variety of methods useful for preventing, resolving and when necessary, initiating a conflict.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 12 students required. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2008

Dr. L. Marcus, Dr. B. Dorn
1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution. Particular emphasis is placed on integrating analytic skills, negotiation techniques and conflict resolution methods into the practice of public health. Much of the class is devoted to simulation exercise in which general concepts and methods are demonstrated and practiced. These exercises model disputes typical of health care settings and public health problems. The debriefing which follows each exercise offers individual feedback, as well as the opportunity to examine applied issues of organizational communication, system design, and conflict. By the end of the course, students will have knowledge of the overt and covert causes of conflict, concepts for analyzing disputes and a variety of methods useful for preventing, resolving and when necessary, initiating a conflict.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 12 students required. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2 2007

Dr. L. Marcus, Dr. B. Dorn
1.25 credits
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution. Particular emphasis is placed on integrating analytic skills, negotiation techniques and conflict resolution methods into the practice of public health. Much of the class is devoted to simulation exercise in which general concepts and methods are demonstrated and practiced. These exercises model disputes typical of health care settings and public health problems. The debriefing which follows each exercise offers individual feedback, as well as the opportunity to examine applied issues of organizational communication, system design, and conflict. By the end of the course, students will have knowledge of the overt and covert causes of conflict, concepts for analyzing disputes and a variety of methods useful for preventing, resolving and when necessary, initiating a conflict.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 12 students required. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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