Course Website Locator: hpm228-01

Harvard School of Public Health

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Fall 2 2009

Mr. G. Moseley
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the full scope of the current health care system in the U.S. Because the system is rapidly evolving, the course is new every year. It is ideal for students who are early in their health care careers or who want a refresher on the changes that have occurred recently. International students and mid-career physicians have found great value in the course.

After tracing the Historical Development of health care in the U.S., we look at the Societal Beliefs and Values that underlie the system. There is a good review of the Key Players and Stakeholders in the system, and how they interact with each other. Individual classes are devoted to Hospitals and the Health Professions. The Managed Care Industry and its practices are also put under a microscope.

For the most expensive health care system in the world, it is important to learn How It is Financed and what is being done to Control Its Soaring Costs. We also will examine the Quality of Care provided by the system and who has Access to it. There is a strong emphasis on the Health Policies that govern the system and the Processes by which those policies are made.

Throughout the course, we will notice the many Legal Issues that are shaping the system, particularly in the areas of Antitrust, Fraud and Abuse, and Taxation. We will spend one session comparing the U.S. system to the way health care is financed and delivered in Other Industrialized Countries. Three classes will address special challenges facing the health care system - last year they were Consumer-Driven Health Care, Medical Technology, and Elder/Long-Term Care.

The learning style in this course involves a lot of dialogue among students and instructor, case studies, guest speakers, and classroom exercises. There are two very short written assignments and a structured final paper requirement.

Course Note: Auditors are not permitted.

Fall 2 2008

Mr. G. Moseley
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the full scope of the current health care system in the U.S. Because the system is rapidly evolving, the course is new every year. It is ideal for students who are early in their health care careers or who want a refresher on the changes that have occurred recently. International students and mid-career physicians have found great value in the course.

After tracing the Historical Development of health care in the U.S., we look at the Societal Beliefs and Values that underlie the system. There is a good review of the Key Players and Stakeholders in the system, and how they interact with each other. Individual classes are devoted to Hospitals and the Health Professions. The Managed Care Industry and its practices are also put under a microscope.

For the most expensive health care system in the world, it is important to learn How It is Financed and what is being done to Control Its Soaring Costs. We also will examine the Quality of Care provided by the system and who has Access to it. There is a strong emphasis on the Health Policies that govern the system and the Processes by which those policies are made.

Throughout the course, we will notice the many Legal Issues that are shaping the system, particularly in the areas of Antitrust, Fraud and Abuse, and Taxation. We will spend one session comparing the U.S. system to the way health care is financed and delivered in Other Industrialized Countries. Three classes will address special challenges facing the health care system - last year they were Consumer-Driven Health Care, Medical Technology, and Elder/Long-Term Care.

The learning style in this course involves a lot of dialogue among students and instructor, case studies, guest speakers, and classroom exercises. There are two very short written assignments and a structured final paper requirement.

Course Note: Auditors are not permitted.

Fall 2 2007

Mr. G. Moseley
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the full scope of the current health care system in the U.S. Because the system is rapidly evolving, the course is new every year. It is ideal for students who are early in their health care careers or who want a refresher on the changes that have occurred recently. International students and mid-career physicians have found great value in the course.

After tracing the Historical Development of health care in the U.S., we look at the Societal Beliefs and Values that underlie the system. There is a good review of the Key Players and Stakeholders in the system, and how they interact with each other. Individual classes are devoted to Hospitals and the Health Professions. The Managed Care Industry and its practices are also put under a microscope.

For the most expensive health care system in the world, it is important to learn How It is Financed and what is being done to Control Its Soaring Costs. We also will examine the Quality of Care provided by the system and who has Access to it. There is a strong emphasis on the Health Policies that govern the system and the Processes by which those policies are made.

Throughout the course, we will notice the many Legal Issues that are shaping the system, particularly in the areas of Antitrust, Fraud and Abuse, and Taxation. We will spend one session comparing the U.S. system to the way health care is financed and delivered in Other Industrialized Countries. Three classes will address special challenges facing the health care system - last year they were Consumer-Driven Health Care, Medical Technology, and Elder/Long-Term Care.

The learning style in this course involves a lot of dialogue among students and instructor, case studies, guest speakers, and classroom exercises. There are two very short written assignments and a structured final paper requirement.

Course Note: Auditors are not permitted.

Fall 2006

Mr. G. Moseley
2.5 credits
Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the full scope of the current health care system in the U.S. Because the system is rapidly evolving, the course is new every year. It is ideal for students who are early in their health care careers or who want a refresher on the changes that have occurred recently. International students and mid-career physicians have found great value in the course.

After tracing the Historical Development of health care in America, we look at the Societal Beliefs and Values that underlie the system. There is a good review of the Key Players and Stakeholders in the system, and how they interact with each other. Individual classes are devoted to Hospitals and the Health Professions. The Managed Care Industry and its practices are also put under a microscope.

For the most expensive health care system in the world, it is important to learn How it is Financed and what is being done to Control its Soaring Costs. We also will examine the Quality of Care provided by the system and who has Access to it. There is a strong emphasis on the Health Policies that govern the system and the Processes by which those policies are make.

Throughout the course, we will notice the many Legal Issues that are shaping the system, particularly in the areas of Antitrust, Fraud and Abuse, and Taxation. We will spend one session comparing the US system to the way health care is financed and delivered in Other Industrialized Countries. Three classes will address special challenges facing the health care system - last year they were Medical Technology, Disease Prevention, and Consumer-Driven Health Care.

The learning style in this course involves a lot of dialogue among students and instructor, case studies and guest speakers. There is a structured final paper requirement at the end of the course.
Course note: Auditors permitted only with permission of instructor. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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