Course Website Locator: hpm218-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Winter 2009

M. Cohen
1.25 credits
Lectures, discussions, case studies. Five 3-hour sessions.

This course introduces students to health law and policy surrounding the integration of "complementary and alternative medical" (CAM) therapies (i.e., therapies historically outside biomedicine, such as chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy, and herbal medicine) into mainstream health care. Topices may include: definition and prevalence of CAM therapies; theory and practice of major CAM therapies; research methodologies and state of the science; licensing and regulation of CAM providers; professional discipline of physicians offering CAM therapies; credentialing and liability management strategies by health care institutions integrating these therapies; malpractice liability and informed consent issues; federal regulation of (and institutional policy involving) dietary supplements; emerging federal policy and state legislative developments; and related ethical questions. Readings are drawn from medical, public health, and health policy literature as well as from statutes and cases.
Course Activities: Students are expected to write an 8 to 10 page final paper and present a synopsis in class. No previous background in law is required although HPM213 and HPM 215 are recommended. Course dates TBA during WinterSesion.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Winter 2008

M. Cohen
1.25 credits
Lectures, discussions, case studies. Five 3-hour sessions.

This course introduces students to health law and policy surrounding the integration of "complementary and alternative medical" (CAM) therapies (i.e., therapies historically outside biomedicine, such as chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy, and herbal medicine) into mainstream health care. Topices may include: definition and prevalence of CAM therapies; theory and practice of major CAM therapies; research methodologies and state of the science; licensing and regulation of CAM providers; professional discipline of physicians offering CAM therapies; credentialing and liability management strategies by health care institutions integrating these therapies; malpractice liability and informed consent issues; federal regulation of (and institutional policy involving) dietary supplements; emerging federal policy and state legislative developments; and related ethical questions. Readings are drawn from medical, public health, and health policy literature as well as from statutes and cases.
Course Activities: Students are expected to write an 8 to 10 page final paper and present a synopsis in class. No previous background in law is required although HPM213 and HPM 215 are recommended. Course dates TBA during WinterSesion.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Winter 2007

M. Cohen
1.25 credits
Lectures, discussions, case studies. Five 3-hour sessions.

This course introduces students to health law and policy surrounding the integration of "complementary and alternative medical" (CAM) therapies (i.e., therapies historically outside biomedicine, such as chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy, and herbal medicine) into mainstream health care. Topices include: definition and prevalence of CAM therapies; theory and practice of major CAM therapies; research methodologies and state of the science; licensing and regulation of CAM providers; professional discipline of physicians offering CAM therapies; credentialing and liability management strategies by health care institutions integrating these therapies; malpractice liability and informed consent issues; federal regulation of (and institutional policy involving) dietary supplements; emerging federal policy and state legislative developments; and related ethical questions. Readings are drawn from medical, public health, and health policy literature as well as from statutes and cases.
Course Activities: Students are expected to write an 8 to 10 page final paper and present a synopsis in class. No previous background in law is required although HPM213 and HPM 215 are recommended. Course dates TBA, from 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm during WinterSesion. (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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