Course Website Locator: epi233-01

Harvard School of Public Health

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Spring 2010

Dr. C. Hsieh, Dr. J. Goodman
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 1.5-hour session each week.

Concerned with the explosion of biological data for etiologic inquiry and the use of existing data to inform public health decision making, the course focuses on research synthesis and meta-analysis. We will review the principles and methods for combining epidemiology studies and introduce how other types of scientific evidence, such as toxicology or mode-of-action data, can be incorporated using weight of- evidence analyses. This course will emphasize the use of critical reviews and meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies.

Course Activities: Students will learn the principles of a systematic review, to use existing meta-analys is software to apply principles outlined in the course on example data sets, and, on a topic of their choice, to conduct a critical review or meta-analysis that appropriately weights effect estimates in each study, assesses uncertainty, and incorporates other kinds of scientific data in the overall analysis.

Course Note: EPI200 or EPI201 and BIO200, BIO201, or BIO202 and BIO203 .

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2009

Dr. R. Van Dam
2.5 credits
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week.

Concerned with the explosion of biological data for etiologic inquiry and the use of existing data to inform clinical decision making and health care policy, the course focuses on research synthesis and evidence-based medicine and public health (meta-analysis). The epidemiologic principles and relevant statistical methods are reviewed and applied to real case studies. Application of methods includes considerations for randomized clinical trials and observational studies of various topics. The use of meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies is emphasized, as is the use of meta-analysis to identify future research questions.
Course Activities: Students learn the principles of a systematic review, conduct a meta-analysis on a topic of their choice and use existing meta-analysis software to apply principles outlined in the course to data sets provided for this purpose.

Course Note: EPI200 or EPI201 and BIO200, BIO201, or BIO202 and BIO203 .

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2008

Dr. R. Van Dam
2.5 credits
Seminars. Two 1.5-hour session each week.

Concerned with the explosion of biological data for etiologic inquiry and the use of existing data to inform clinical decision making and health care policy, the course focuses on research synthesis and evidence-based medicine and public health (meta-analysis). The epidemiologic principles and relevant statistical methods are reviewed and applied to real case studies. Application of methods includes considerations for randomized clinical trials and observational studies of various topics. The use of meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies is emphasized, as is the use of meta-analysis to identify future research questions.
Course Activities: Students learn the principles of a systematic review, conduct a meta-analysis on a topic of their choice and use existing meta-analysis software to apply principles outlined in the course to data sets provided for this purpose.

Course Note: EPI200 or EPI201 and BIO200, BIO201, or BIO202 and BIO203 .

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 1 2007

Dr. R. Van Dam (P), Dr. M. Stampfer (S)
2.5 credits
Seminars. Two 1.5-hour session each week.

Concerned with the explosion of biological data for etiologic inquiry and the use of existing data to inform clinical decision making and health care policy, the course focuses on research synthesis and evidence-based medicine and public health (meta-analysis.) The epidemiologic principles and relevant statistical methods are reviewed and applied to real case studies. Application of methods includes considerations for randomized clinical trials and observational studies of various topics. The use of meta-analysis to explore data and identify sources of variation among studies is emphasized, as is the use of meta-analysis to identify future research questions.
Course Activities: Students learn the principles of a systematic review, prepare a protocol to conduct a meta-analysis and use existing meta-analysis software to apply principles outlined in the course to many data sets provided for this purpose. Students are encouraged to bring their own data for analysis.
Course Note: EPI200 or EPI201 and BIO200, BIO201, or BIO202 and BIO203 . (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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