Course Website Locator: epi224-01

Harvard School of Public Health

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Spring 2 2010

Dr. L. Frazier, Dr. C. Stein
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour session each week

The course will help students develop a framework for analyzing and designing cancer prevention interventions to reduce the burden of cancer. Approaches to cancer prevention will be reviewed with the principal emphasis on primary prevention. The lectures and readings will examine different theoretical and practical issues around effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of interventions, including theories of behavior change, population vs. high-risk approaches, risk perception and communication, and barriers to implementation. Through problem-based learning exercises, students will review the strategies for cancer prevention in the areas of tobacco control, physical activity and obesity, and screening and vaccines, in addition to other topics. We will emphasize the timing of prevention in the context of the natural history of disease etiology (e.g. breast cancer) and consider population-based approaches to prevention (e.g. skin cancer). Strategies for prevention on multiple levels will also be examined. Levels of intervention from action by health care providers (e.g., counseling and screening), regulatory policy, social structural changes, and individual behavior changes will be emphasized. Key components necessary for prevention policy will include an adequate knowledge base, social strategies, and political will. Students will have homework assignments to collect and summarize information based on case studies, which will be used to develop a cancer prevention intervention as a final project. Grades will be based on class participation, short homework assignments and a final project paper and presentation.
Course Note: Requirement in the Cancer Education Program.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.
Course Evaluations

Spring 2 2009

Dr. L. Frazier, Dr. C. Stein
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

The course will help students develop a framework for analyzing and designing cancer prevention interventions to reduce the burden of cancer. Approaches to cancer prevention will be reviewed with the principal emphasis on primary prevention. The lectures and readings will examine different theoretical and practical issues around effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of interventions, including theories of behavior change, population vs. high-risk approaches, risk perception and communication, and barriers to implementation. Through problem-based learning exercises, students will review the strategies for cancer prevention in the areas of tobacco control, physical activity and obesity, and screening and vaccines, in addition to other topics. We will emphasize the timing of prevention in the context of the natural history of disease etiology (e.g. breast cancer) and consider population-based approaches to prevention (e.g. skin cancer). Strategies for prevention on multiple levels will also be examined. Levels of intervention from action by health care providers (e.g., counseling and screening), regulatory policy, social structural changes, and individual behavior changes will be emphasized. Key components necessary for prevention policy will include an adequate knowledge base, social strategies, and political will. Students will have homework assignments to collect and summarize information based on case studies, which will be used to develop a cancer prevention intervention as a final project. Grades will be based on class participation, short homework assignments and a final project paper and presentation.
Course Note: Requirement in the Cancer Education Program.


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.
Course Evaluations

Fall 2007

Dr. C. Stein
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

The course will help students develop a framework for analyzing and designing cancer prevention interventions to reduce the burden of cancer. Approaches to cancer prevention will be reviewed with the principal emphasis on primary prevention. The lectures and readings will examine different theoretical and practical issues around effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of interventions, including theories of behavior change, population vs. high-risk approaches, risk perception and communication, and barriers to implementation. Through problem-based learning exercises, students will review the strategies for cancer prevention in the areas of tobacco control, physical activity and obesity, and screening and vaccines, in addition to other topics. We will emphasize the timing of prevention in the context of the natural history of disease etiology (e.g. breast cancer) and consider population-based approaches to prevention (e.g. skin cancer). Strategies for prevention on multiple levels will also be examined. Levels of intervention from action by health care providers (e.g., counseling and screening), regulatory policy, social structural changes, and individual behavior changes will be emphasized. Key components necessary for prevention policy will include an adequate knowledge base, social strategies, and political will. Students will have homework assignments to collect and summarize information based on case studies, which will be used to develop a cancer prevention intervention as a final project. Grades will be based on class participation, short homework assignments and a final project paper and presentation.
Course Note: Requirement in the Cancer Education Program. (9.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.
Course Evaluations


Fall 2006

Dr. C. Stein
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

The course will help students develop a framework for analyzing and designing cancer prevention interventions to reduce the burden of cancer. Approaches to cancer prevention will be reviewed with the principal emphasis on primary prevention. The lectures and readings will examine different theoretical and practical issues around effectiveness, feasibility, and sustainability of interventions, including theories of behavior change, population vs. high-risk approaches, risk perception and communication, and barriers to implementation. Through problem-based learning exercises, students will review the strategies for cancer prevention in the areas of tobacco control, physical activity and obesity, and screening and vaccines, in addition to other topics. We will emphasize the timing of prevention in the context of the natural history of disease etiology (e.g. breast cancer) and consider population-based approaches to prevention (e.g. skin cancer). Strategies for prevention on multiple levels will also be examined. Levels of intervention from action by health care providers (e.g., counseling and screening), regulatory policy, social structural changes, and individual behavior changes will be emphasized. Key components necessary for prevention policy will include an adequate knowledge base, social strategies, and political will. Students will have homework assignments to collect and summarize information based on case studies, which will be used to develop a cancer prevention intervention as a final project. Grades will be based on class participation, short homework assignments and a final project paper and presentation.
Course Note: Requirement in the Cancer Education Program. (9.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.
Course Evaluations


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