Course Website Locator: eh504-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Fall 2009

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-215 and at HMS as BPH-713.0
Dr. R. Wright
5 credits
Lectures, case studies, labs. Two 2-hour classes each week.

The course is designed to expose students to the principles and methods that should be used to determine whether a causal relationship exists between specific doses of an agent and an alleged adverse effect, observed primarily in humans. Integration of principles and methods of toxicology is extremely important since the primary purpose of toxicology is to predict human toxicity. Toxicological data obtained in animal studies must be placed in proper relationship to the exposure observed in the human population. The course deals with organ systems and whole organisms but relies on an understanding of the mechanistic approaches covered in EH508. Key target organs, selected classes of toxic agents and the application of toxicological principles are covered. Students are assigned a topic for a short presentation.
Course notes: Organic chemistry and mammalian physiology or equivalents required; instructor's signature required if student has not met prerequisites; required lab. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 2.5 credits, select section 02 (pass/fail grading option).


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2008

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-215 and at HMS as BPH-713.0
Dr. A. W. Hayes (P), Dr. R. Wright (S)
5 credits
Lectures, case studies, labs. Two 2-hour classes each week.

The course is designed to expose students to the principles and methods that should be used to determine whether a causal relationship exists between specific doses of an agent and an alleged adverse effect, observed primarily in humans. Integration of principles and methods of toxicology is extremely important since the primary purpose of toxicology is to predict human toxicity. Toxicological data obtained in animal studies must be placed in proper relationship to the exposure observed in the human population. The course deals with organ systems and whole organisms but relies on an understanding of the mechanistic approaches covered in EH508. Key target organs, selected classes of toxic agents and the application of toxicological principles are covered. Students are assigned a topic for a short presentation.
Course notes: Organic chemistry and mammalian physiology or equivalents required; instructor's signature required if student has not met prerequisites; required lab. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 2.5 credits, select section 02 (pass/fail grading option). (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2007

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-215 and at HMS as BPH-713.0
Dr. A. W. Hayes (P), TBA
5 credits
Lectures, case studies, labs. Two 2-hour classes each week.

The course is designed to expose students to the principles and methods that should be used to determine whether a causal relationship exists between specific doses of an agent and an alleged adverse effect, observed primarily in humans. Integration of principles and methods of toxicology is extremely important since the primary purpose of toxicology is to predict human toxicity. Toxicological data obtained in animal studies must be placed in proper relationship to the exposure observed in the human population. The course deals with organ systems and whole organisms but relies on an understanding of the mechanistic approaches covered in EH508. Key target organs, selected classes of toxic agents and the application of toxicological principles are covered. Students are assigned a topic for a short presentation.
Course notes: Organic chemistry and mammalian physiology or equivalents required; instructor's signature required if student has not met prerequisites; required lab. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 2.5 credits, select section 02 (pass/fail grading option). (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2006

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-215 and at HMS as BPH-713.0
Dr. A. W. Hayes (P), Dr. J. Brain (S)
5 credits
Lectures, case studies, labs. Two 2-hour classes each week.

The course is designed to expose students to the principles and methods that should be used to determine whether a causal relationship exists between specific doses of an agent and an alleged adverse effect, observed primarily in humans. Integration of principles and methods of toxicology is extremely important since the primary purpose of toxicology is to predict human toxicity. Toxicological data obtained in animal studies must be placed in proper relationship to the exposure observed in the human population. The course deals with organ systems and whole organisms but relies on an understanding of the mechanistic approaches covered in EH508. Key target organs, selected classes of toxic agents and the application of toxicological principles are covered. Students are assigned a topic for a short presentation.
Course notes: Organic chemistry and mammalian physiology or equivalents required; instructor's signature required if student has not met prerequisites; required lab. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 2.5 credits, select section 02 (pass/fail grading option). (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Copyright © 2012 The President and Fellows of Harvard College