Course Website Locator: eh279-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Fall 2009

Dr. E. Maher
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

Starting with the fundamentals of radiation protection, this course then treats in-depth selected topics in occupational and environmental radiation protection (e.g. risk assessment of exposures to diagnostic and therapeutic x rays; use of lung and metabolic models in evaluation of the hazard from inhalation and ingestion of radioactive chemicals; hazard from indoor radon; radiological assessments regarding nuclear power, war, and radiological terrorism; hazards from microwaves, cellular phones and other sources of nonionizing radiation; case studies of radiation accidents; management of university and hospital radiation programs). The course has been developed with the needs of students enrolled in environmental science and engineering, occupational health and the MPH program in mind.
Course Activities: Class discussions, homework assignments. Students will prepare a term position paper and oral presentation defending their stand on a controversial subject of their choice in a form suitable for consideration by management.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 10 students required; enrollment limited to 15 students; signature of instructor required. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2008

Dr. E. Maher
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

Starting with the fundamentals of radiation protection, this course then treats in-depth selected topics in occupational and environmental radiation protection (e.g. risk assessment of exposures to diagnostic and therapeutic x rays; use of lung and metabolic models in evaluation of the hazard from inhalation and ingestion of radioactive chemicals; hazard from indoor radon; radiological assessments regarding nuclear power, war, and radiological terrorism; hazards from microwaves, cellular phones and other sources of nonionizing radiation; case studies of radiation accidents; management of university and hospital radiation programs). The course has been developed with the needs of students enrolled in environmental science and engineering, occupational health and the MPH program in mind.
Course Activities: Class discussions, homework assignments. Students will prepare a term position paper and oral presentation defending their stand on a controversial subject of their choice in a form suitable for consideration by management.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 10 students required; enrollment limited to 15 students; signature of instructor required. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2007

Dr. E. Maher
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

Starting with the fundamentals of radiation protection, this course then treats in-depth selected topics in occupational and environmental radiation protection (e.g. risk assessment of exposures to diagnostic and therapeutic x rays; use of lung and metabolic models in evaluation of the hazard from inhalation and ingestion of radioactive chemicals; hazard from indoor radon; radiological assessments regarding nuclear power, war, and radiological terrorism; hazards from microwaves, cellular phones and other sources of nonionizing radiation; case studies of radiation accidents; management of university and hospital radiation programs). The course has been developed with the needs of students enrolled in environmental science and engineering, occupational health and the MPH program in mind.
Course Activities: Class discussions, homework assignments. Students will prepare a term position paper and oral presentation defending their stand on a controversial subject of their choice in a form suitable for consideration by management.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 10 students required; enrollment limited to 15 students; signature of instructor required. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2006

Dr. E. Maher
2.5 credits
Lectures, case studies. One 2-hour session each week

Starting with the fundamentals of radiation protection, this course then treats in-depth selected topics in occupational and environmental radiation protection (e.g. risk assessment of exposures to diagnostic and therapeutic x rays; use of lung and metabolic models in evaluation of the hazard from inhalation and ingestion of radioactive chemicals; hazard from indoor radon; radiological assessments regarding nuclear power, war, and radiological terrorism; hazards from microwaves, cellular phones and other sources of nonionizing radiation; case studies of radiation accidents; management of university and hospital radiation programs). The course has been developed with the needs of students enrolled in environmental science and engineering, occupational health and the MPH program in mind.
Course Activities: Class discussions, homework assignments. Students will prepare a term position paper and oral presentation defending their stand on a controversial subject of their choice in a form suitable for consideration by management.
Course Note: Minimum enrollment of 10 students required; enrollment limited to 15 students; signature of instructor required. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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