Course Website Locator: eh278-02

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Spring 2008

Cross-listed at HMS as H0703.0
Dr. P. Epstein, Dr. E. Chivian, Dr. D.Goodenough, Dr. M. Perry
5.0 credits, ordinal grading option. For 2.5 credits, pass/fail grading option register for EH278, section 02.
Lectures. One 4-hour session each week.

Human activity is changing the atmosphere and altering terrestrial and marine ecosystems on a global scale for the first time in history. Evidence is mounting that these changes may already be having serious effects on human health, and there is growing concern that in coming decades the effects could be catastrophic. This course will provide an overview of the basic physics, chemistry, and biology of global environmental change, and of the potential consequences of these changes for human health. It will cover global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, the effects of toxic substance pollution on global ecosystems, the degradation of terrestrial and marine environments, the loss of species and biodiversity, and the impact of these factors on human health. The role of rapidly growing human populations and of patterns of resource use and waste disposal in the genesis of environmental change will be examined. A multi-disciplinary faculty will provide an integrated assessment of these issues. The course will be open to all students at Harvard University, but preference will be given to students from HSPH, HMS, and KSG, as well as to Environmental Science Public Policy majors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to approximately 40 students from SPH, 75 students total. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 5.0 credits, select EH278, section 01 (ordinal grading option), for 2.5 credits, select EH278, section 02 (pass/fail grading option.) (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Spring 2007

Cross-listed at HMS as H0703.0
Dr. P. Epstein, Dr. E. Chivian, Dr. D.Goodenough, Dr. M. Perry
5.0 credits, ordinal grading option. For 2.5 credits, pass/fail grading option register for EH278, section 02.
Lectures. One 4-hour session each week.

Human activity is changing the atmosphere and altering terrestrial and marine ecosystems on a global scale for the first time in history. Evidence is mounting that these changes may already be having serious effects on human health, and there is growing concern that in coming decades the effects could be catastrophic. This course will provide an overview of the basic physics, chemistry, and biology of global environmental change, and of the potential consequences of these changes for human health. It will cover global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, the effects of toxic substance pollution on global ecosystems, the degradation of terrestrial and marine environments, the loss of species and biodiversity, and the impact of these factors on human health. The role of rapidly growing human populations and of patterns of resource use and waste disposal in the genesis of environmental change will be examined. A multi-disciplinary faculty will provide an integrated assessment of these issues. The course will be open to all students at Harvard University, but preference will be given to students from HSPH, HMS, and KSG, as well as to Environmental Science Public Policy majors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Course Note: Enrollment limited to approximately 40 students from SPH, 75 students total. This course may be taken for either 5.0 credits or 2.5 credits. To register for 5.0 credits, select EH278, section 01 (ordinal grading option), for 2.5 credits, select EH278, section 02 (pass/fail grading option.) (5.06)

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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