Course Website Locator: eh223-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Fall 2009

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-206
Dr. J. Butler
5 credits
Lectures, demonstrations. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

This course will cover in depth three major aspects of pulmonary physiology. At the level of structure, lung mechanics in health and disease will be described, along with pulmonary function tests and their interpretation. At the level of function, gas exchange with blood will be emphasized, with quantitative emphases on the distributions of
ventilation and perfusion. The control of breathing will be explored, with an emphasis on dyspnea and the role of chemical drive and its modulation. Special topics may include, amoung other themes, aerosol transport and deposition, host defense and the inflammatory response, and airway hyperactivity in asthma.

Text:

1. J.B. West, Respiratory Physiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2004
2. J.B. West, Pulmonary Pathophysiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2003.

Optional resource text: E.R. Weibel, The Pathway for Oxygen, Harvard Univ. Press, 1984

There will be one midterm exam, a research paper with class presentation, and a final. Homework consists in studying text material and lecture notes, and classroom participation in discussion of provocative and nontrivial questions raised during the previous class.

Course Note: EH 205 or equivalent or college-level physiology strongly suggested.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2008

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-206
Dr. J. Butler
5 credits
Lectures, demonstrations. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

This course will cover in depth three major aspects of pulmonary physiology. At the level of structure, lung mechanics in health and disease will be described, along with pulmonary function tests and their interpretation. At the level of function, gas exchange with blood will be emphasized, with quantitative emphases on the distributions of
ventilation and perfusion. The control of breathing will be explored, with an emphasis on dyspnea and the role of chemical drive and its modulation. Special topics may include, amoung other themes, aerosol transport and deposition, host defense and the inflammatory response, and airway hyperactivity in asthma.

Text:

1. J.B. West, Respiratory Physiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2004
2. J.B. West, Pulmonary Pathophysiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2003.

Optional resource text: E.R. Weibel, The Pathway for Oxygen, Harvard Univ. Press, 1984

There will be one midterm exam, a research paper with class presentation, and a final. Homework consists in studying text material and lecture notes, and classroom participation in discussion of provocative and nontrivial questions raised during the previous class.

Course Note: EH 205 or equivalent or college-level physiology strongly suggested.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2007

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-206
Dr. J. Butler
5 credits
Lectures, demonstrations. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

This course will cover in depth three major aspects of pulmonary physiology. At the level of structure, lung mechanics in health and disease will be described, along with pulmonary function tests and their interpretation. At the level of function, gas exchange with blood will be emphasized, with quantitative emphases on the distributions of
ventilation and perfusion. The control of breathing will be explored, with an emphasis on dyspnea and the role of chemical drive and its modulation. Special topics may include, amoung other themes, aerosol transport and deposition, host defense and the inflammatory response, and airway hyperactivity in asthma.

Text:

1. J.B. West, Respiratory Physiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2004
2. J.B. West, Pulmonary Pathophysiology, 5th edition, Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 2003.

Optional resource text: E.R. Weibel, The Pathway for Oxygen, Harvard Univ. Press, 1984

There will be one midterm exam, a research paper with class presentation, and a final. Homework consists in studying text material and lecture notes, and classroom participation in discussion of provocative and nontrivial questions raised during the previous class.

Course Note: EH 205 or equivalent or college-level physiology strongly suggested.

Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

Fall 2006

Cross-listed at FAS as BPH-206
Dr. J. Butler, Dr. R. Banzett
5 credits
Lectures, demonstrations. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

Respiratory measurement is an integral part of public health research, coming into play in environmental exposure assessment, dose estimation, and outcome measures and is fundamental to assessment of lung disease, genetic and phenotypic variation, and drug effects in humans and animals. We will teach the scientific basis of a wide range of respiratory measurements (tailored to students' needs and interests,) practical considerations and pitfalls. We will critically discuss what is actually being measured, appropriate interpretations and, importantly, what can be inferred about physiological status and disease. This emphasis reflects the growing need for understanding respiratory measurements, their uses and their physiologic basis.
Course Activities: Lab practicals and demonstrations.
Course Note: EH 205 or equivalent or college-level physiology strongly suggested. (5.06)


Course evaluations are an important method for feedback on the quality of course offerings. The submission of a course evaluation is a requirement for this course. Your grade for the course will be made available only after you have submitted responses to at least the first three questions of the on-line evaluation for this course.

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