Course Website Locator: bio227-01

Harvard School of Public Health

The following course websites match your request:

Fall 2 2009

Dr. N. Laird
2.5 Credits
Lectures, laboratories. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

This course introduces students to the diverse statistical methods used throughout the process of genetic epidemiology, from familial aggregation and segregation studies to linkage scans candidate-gene association studies. Topics covered include multipoint and model-free linkage analysis, linkage disequilibrium, family-based and population-based association test, and study design. Instructors use ongoing research into the genetics of asthma and cancer to illustrate basic principles. Homework includes analysis projects to familiarity students with state-of-the-art software for linkage analysis, family-based association tests, and case-control studies. Some familiarity with molecular biology and statistical hypothesis testing (e.g. material covered in EPI249 and BIO201) is helpful, although not necessary, as relevant concepts will be reviewed in lectures and labs. Students should leave with a basic understanding of how to read and evaluate statistical studies of genetics epidemiology.

Course Note: Lab or section time will be announced at first meeting.

Fall 2 2008

Dr. C. Lange.
2.5 Credits
Lectures, laboratories. Two 1.5-hour sessions each week.

This course introduces students to the diverse statistical methods used throughout the process of genetic epidemiology, from familial aggregation and segregation studies to linkage scans candidate-gene association studies. Topics covered include multipoint and model-free linkage analysis, linkage disequilibrium, family-based and population-based association test, and study design. Instructors use ongoing research into the genetics of asthma and cancer to illustrate basic principles. Homework includes analysis projects to familiarity students with state-of-the-art software for linkage analysis, family-based association tests, and case-control studies. Some familiarity with molecular biology and statistical hypothesis testing (e.g. material covered in EPI249 and BIO201) is helpful, although not necessary, as relevant concepts will be reviewed in lectures and labs. Students should leave with a basic understanding of how to read and evaluate statistical studies of genetics epidemiology.

Course Note: Lab or section time will be announced at first meeting.

Fall 2006

Dr. C. Lange
2.5 credits
Lectures, laboratories. Two 2-hour sessions each week.

This course introduces students to the diverse statistical methods used throughout the process of genetic pidemiology, from familial aggregation and segregation studies to linkage scans and candidate-gene association studies. Topics covered include multipoint and model-free linkage analysis, linkage disequilibrium, family-based and population-based association tests, and study design. Instructors use ongoing research into the genetics of asthma and cancer to illustrate basic principles. Homework includes analysis projects to familiarize students with state-of-the-art software for linkage analysis, family-based association tests, and case-control studies. Some familiarity with molecular biology and statistical hypothesis testing (e.g. material covered in EPI249 and BIO201) is helpful, although not necessary, as relevant concepts will be reviewed in lectures and labs. Students should leave with a basic understanding of how to read and evaluate statistical studies of genetic epidemiology. (5.06)


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